The C Word

Chris Neal | December 9th, 2010

There is country radio, and then there is Country Radio.

When I first began covering the business a decade ago, I was at first annoyed to see the way that radio insiders insisted on referring to their milieu as “Country Radio” in every casual mention (see here)—but I eventually became grateful for the useful distinction. The uncapitalized “country radio” describes any radio station that plays country music, no matter what the vintage or pedigree. The capitalized version (in every way), “Country Radio,” describes any radio station that exclusively plays the modern, contemporary incarnation of country music. The split definition allowed me to understand that when people in the industry talk about “country,” they mean the entirety of the genre; when they talk about “Country,” they mean whatever music fits into that radio format right now. The debates over whether Lady Antebellum, Taylor Swift or Jason Aldean are “country” can continue into infinity (and surely will), but certainly they are “Country” as the marketplace now defines it.

So where is the connective sinew between “country” and “Country,” and is it strong enough to ensure the genre’s future? It’s not as if the split between what passionate country fans considered the music to be and what the industry considered it to be has never occurred before. Every argument that is now made against the current crop of pop-and rock-influenced acts has been made before, during one of Nashville’s previous periods of cross-genre pollination. Traditionalists seethed when countrypolitan was all the rage during the early 1960s, and again when the success of Urban Cowboy sent the denizens of Music City looking for the bright lights of crossover success. By 1975 author Paul Hemphill had declared, “Country music isn’t really country anymore; it is a hybrid of nearly every form of popular music in America.” Acts from Ray Price to Dolly Parton, and from Conway Twitty to Johnny Cash, have at some point been accused of having insufficient country credibility. (As the keeper of the Country Weekly letters page at the time, I was stunned to find how many older fans wrote in after Cash’s death to declare that they had never considered him “country” at all.)

The genre has historically tended to cleanse its palate with a back-to-basics phase like the 1980s “neotraditionalist” movement—the trend Steve Earle famously referred to as “the great credibility scare.” Whether or not such a renewal of roots is in the offing anytime soon is impossible to say. The relatively recent successes of 2000’s O Brother Where Art Thou? soundtrack and Gretchen Wilson’s 2004 debut Here for the Party each seemed primed to set off a widespread return to the old school (actually two very different old schools), but in both cases the multiplatinum sales of one album failed to spark a greater trend. At the end of 2010, “Country Radio” is a jumble of sleek modern hitmakers (Aldean, Rascal Flatts, Carrie Underwood, Keith Urban), holdover automatic-add superstars from the ‘90s (Alan Jackson, Tim McGraw, Kenny Chesney, Toby Keith, Trace Adkins) and ‘80s (George Strait, Reba McEntire) and a mixed bag of younger acts trying to gain a proper foothold in an uncertain time.

During a period such as this one, when the genre is musically drawing in so many outside influences, the ties that bind modern country to its traditional sources can be hard to find. If considered in a vacuum, a current track like Swift’s “Better Than Revenge” is straight-up rock ‘n’ roll replete with blaring guitars and thwacking drums; Lady Antebellum’s “Need You Now” is a slick pop song outfitted with George Harrison-esque slide-guitar curlicues instead of weeping lap-steel flourishes; Sugarland’s arena-engineered The Incredible Machine is practically an album-length ode to the U2 of 1987. That all of these acts are comfortable on “Country Radio” means that their appeal to the format’s core audience goes beyond the strictly musical, which is in itself nothing new. There is no genre (rap included) in which lyrical content takes such prominence over musical content. When country songwriters gather on Music Row to come up with the hits of tomorrow, you can bet they’re focused first and foremost on finding a clever or striking lyrical hook; the musical backing isn’t an afterthought (necessarily), but it’s rarely the first priority.

Aldean’s music leans on classic-rock crunch rather than country twang, but his lyrics tell the story country fans want to hear: Small towns are better than big cities, and rural values are superior to urban values. Underwood’s music can get as glossy and poppy as it wants—she sings about Jesus and her mama, and values voters aren’t going to get that from rock radio. Swift’s three albums have each been successively poppier in their sound, but she deals with her chosen subject matter with an earnestness that pop will generally not tolerate. Zac Brown doesn’t look much like a modern country star, but when his first major foray into the genre is about fried chicken, blue jeans and the U.S. military it doesn’t matter. Rascal Flatts is musically adult contemporary, but the values they essay in song are pure country—and so “Country Radio” continues to hammer away at their increasingly indistinguishable hits. But the definition goes beyond lyrics as well, and into the culture of Nashville; country stars are expected to behave in a particular manner (humble, approachable), to hold particular beliefs (patriotism, Christianity) and to acknowledge their forbears in the music’s tradition whether or not their music bears the slightest resemblance to Hank, Merle, Willie or whomever. Meet those qualifications, and a few distorted guitars are overlooked with ease.

Great traditional country music is still being made, it’s just not on “Country Radio.” If you want to find it, well, that’s why the Internet was invented. If you’re waiting for it to return to the airwaves in a major way, you might be waiting for a while. In the meantime, for better or worse, the format will continue to be defined by a lot more than its purely musical content.

1 Ping

  1. [...] Chris Neal pointed out in his thoughtful “C Word” post on this site earlier this month, arguments over what’s country and what isn’t, how [...]
  1. Paul W Dennis
    December 9, 2010 at 7:30 am

    Unfortunately, everything you said is true. That said, I’d still rather listen to modern country than any other genre of music currently available on the airwaves. The stories and attitudes are still there, even if the beloved twin fiddles & steel played in tandem (and carrying the melody) are missing.

    In the car I still listen to Country, although not always. At home I listen to the better stuff

  2. Joey
    December 9, 2010 at 7:51 am

    We just got a new country station, and I love it. I love the fact that they play the Secret Sisters on a regular basis.

  3. Jason
    December 9, 2010 at 8:13 am

    I totally get the point of articles like this. And there are alot of them written. However, as program director of a small market FM country station, it’s worth noting (and the majority of said articles do not) that there are stations out there that don’t play what the charts or clearchannel tells us to. Not many of them, but we are out there.

  4. Josh
    December 9, 2010 at 8:29 am

    Great article…I gotta commmend the author for trying his hand in labelling/identifying certain bands in a categorical context…made me think about it for some time.

  5. Tank
    December 9, 2010 at 8:30 am

    Great read. Too often I hear (and sometimes write) a one sided approach that is really just banner waving for whichever side of the country/Country debate you are on. This does a great job of connecting the two.

  6. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 9:54 am

    Great article. I think one reason Country Radio (note capitals) features so much music that’s basically rehashed lite-rock from the ’80′s is that both genres have pretty much the same audience. Not the same demographics, but literally the same people. Top-40 radio started getting too far into rap or alternative rock for a lot of people in the early ’90′s, and guess where they went? Country Radio, and that’s where they stayed. Your mom, who used to listen to Huey Lewis, Richard Marx and Whitney Houston in the ’80′s, now listens to Country Radio. The high-school girls who listened to Bon Jovi and Def Leppard and ZZ Top (post-drum machines) in the ’80′s, now listens to Country Radio. They like “country, but not that tear-in-your-beer stuff,” or they say they like, “all kinds of music except rap or heavy metal.” And since females 25-54 are the “money demographic” for these stations, that’s just what they get. Songs about sassy chicks and good hardworking guys, tales straight out of the Joan Johnston or Tina Leonard soft-core “redneck romance” novels. It is what it is, as they say.

  7. brz
    December 9, 2010 at 10:09 am

    Fizz – you nailed it. i couldn’t agree more!

  8. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 10:22 am

    Really, the Country artists of today owe early- and mid-’90′s rappers a big debt, for basically chasing people away from top-40 radio and straight to country.

  9. Ben Foster
    December 9, 2010 at 11:14 am

    That was a really great essay (I’m sure Swift, Underwood, and Aldean would also like it, since it would help them make a case for their country cred). Very true. It reminds me to always watch my capitalization when talking about country music or “Country Music.”

  10. Lewis
    December 9, 2010 at 11:38 am

    How about explaining Darius Rucker, Uncle Kracker, Kid Rock, Kelly Clarkson, and Jewel and others and how each one of them turned into country music singers overnight after their pop careers had cooled off or no one at rock radio cared for them anymore so they turned them to country radio? As far as I know, Kid Rock’s new album hasn’t even made an appearance on the country albums chart and yet “Born Free” has made an appearance on the country singles chart. Perhaps there should be an article about those singers moving over to country than the other way around when Dolly Parton, Kenny Rogers, Eddie Rabbitt and Crystal Gayle moved to pop radio and competed for a time.

  11. stormy
    December 9, 2010 at 11:58 am

    Fizz:
    1. Wasn’t it around 2003 when USA Today ran an article about Rap overtaking country in terms of popularity?
    2. Who do you think that Loretta Lynn was singing to when she belted “now I’ve got the pill” in triumph? How about The Judds when they were singing about your baby having the blues? Suzy Boggus when she asked Cinderella if the shoe fit her now? Country music has long had a strong female voice and one that women relate to. And the majority of the women on this board like their music country.

  12. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 12:08 pm

    1. I don’t remember that article, but I’d be interested to know who they were referring to. Rap had overtaken country for whom?
    2. Never said any of that wasn’t true.

  13. stormy
    December 9, 2010 at 12:18 pm

    1. In overall popularity in terms of percentage of overall album sales.
    2. So maybe we can all stop blaming women for country going pop now.

  14. Troy
    December 9, 2010 at 12:28 pm

    “How about explaining Darius Rucker, Uncle Kracker, Kid Rock, Kelly Clarkson, and Jewel and others and how each one of them turned into country music singers overnight after their pop careers had cooled off or no one at rock radio cared for them anymore so they turned them to country radio”

    Having a number one single in the US, and UK and selling over a million albums on the last album is cooling off?

  15. Calvin
    December 9, 2010 at 12:29 pm

    “…but his lyrics tell the story country fans want to hear: Small towns are better than big cities, and rural values are superior to urban values. ”

    This is a common theme on Country Radio now days and it may be what the fans want to hear but its not going to attract any new converts. Its just preaching to the crowd, plus the theme is just not as socially relevant as it was when Haggard was doing it.

  16. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 12:32 pm

    1. Maybe so, but country was still the #1 radio format at the time, might still be. And rap certainly doesn’t seem to be quite as popular as it used to be a few years ago.
    2. Didn’t think I was “blaming women” for country going pop, but am I wrong that women (and men too) bailing from other genres have been a very important demographic in country (or Country’s) dominance in the last 20 years? All, right, I’ll even it out for you. Know who else listens to country music these days? The guys in the ’80′s who listened to Springsteen, who started wearing cowboy boots and snap-button shirts and going to line-dancing nigh at Tumbleweeds Bar ‘N’ Grill because they figured it was a good way to pick up women.

  17. Jon
    December 9, 2010 at 12:36 pm

    It’s never a problem to get Fizz to enlarge the number of people he feels superior to because of his musical taste, is it?

  18. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 12:40 pm

    Who were you referring to specifically, Troy? Uncle Kracker never really had a career except as Kid Rock’s sidekick. As for Rock himself, he’s nowhere near as popular on rock radio as he was circa 1999-2001, and somehow finds crossover success seemingly at will. Darius Rucker? Hootie and the Blowfish were huge for one album, and everything else was a commercial flop by comparison.

  19. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 12:43 pm

    Even less a problem getting Jonny-Boy to go all supercilious on us mere peons. Dude has to flash whatever industry credentials he has in the mirror when nobody’s around, just to keep his spirits up.

  20. Troy
    December 9, 2010 at 12:47 pm

    Kelly Clarkson “My Life Would Suck Without you went #1 and she had two other top 20 singles and her album has sold over a million copies.

  21. Jon
    December 9, 2010 at 12:47 pm

    By the way, just to throw a little data into the discussion…

    From the RIAA’s 2008 consumer profile:

    1999: Rap/Hip-Hop 10.8% Country 10.8%
    2000: 12.9 10.7
    2001: 11.4 10.5
    2002: 13.8 10.7
    2003: 13.3 10.4
    2004: 12.1 13.0
    2005: 13.3 12.5
    2006: 11.4 13.0
    2007: 10.8 11.5
    2008: 10.7 11.9

    Also, there’s actually a fairly extensive literature that looks at Country Radio (or is it country radio?) listeners in terms of whether they listen to other formats and, if so, which ones.

  22. Barry Mazor
    December 9, 2010 at 12:50 pm

    There are a lot of myths out there about the make-up/breakdown of today’s country audience, most of them blown to bits by the CMA’s serious and detailed consumer study release to CMA members last year. One was the average income of country fans–which is actually substantially higher than a lot of us would have figured.

    One very interesting finding was that, in fact, the percentage of women among today’s country fans (defined by sufficient amounts of listening to radio, going to shows, buying music, etc.) is really only slightly larger than that of the men–and barely at all more than the existing larger percentage of women in the population overall.

    That study reported one thing broadcasters, performers, recording companies and music publishers pretty well knew–that it’s easier to sell country music to people who are already committed to it–but it also found some very interesting things regarding where the best chances of adding to the audience would be, who new country fans would be. . And THAT included hardcore music fans who like to be on top of all sorts of music, including country, and, oh yes–Hispanic Americans, who are taking to country in substantial numbers, especially across the Southwest.

  23. Troy
    December 9, 2010 at 12:52 pm

    Also, there’s actually a fairly extensive literature that looks at Country Radio (or is it country radio?) listeners in terms of whether they listen to other formats and, if so, which ones.

    Where? That would be interesting to read

  24. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 1:00 pm

    I think we had this discussion once before, Jon. I was talking about format popularity based on number of stations.

    Very interesting stuff, Barry.

  25. Jon
    December 9, 2010 at 1:06 pm

    @Fizz Didn’t Stormy ask or say something about CD sales? Why yes, she did.

  26. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 1:10 pm

    And did I not counter with something about radio? Why, golly gee, I think I did, too!

  27. Jon
    December 9, 2010 at 1:23 pm

    So? I would think it would be obvious that my post wasn’t a reply to yours.

  28. Jon
    December 9, 2010 at 1:31 pm

    @Troy See, for instance, the studio to which Barry referred.

  29. Jon
    December 9, 2010 at 1:45 pm

    And by the way, I don’t think Chris would disagree that there really wasn’t ever a time that country music wasn’t defined by a lot more than its purely musical content. (In the nitpicking department, the pop-flavored country of the early 60s was called “the Nashville Sound”; countrypolitan is late 60s/early 70s pop-country, what came between the Nashville Sound of the early 60s and the Urban Cowboy boom, with Billy Sherrill often identified as a, if not the prime mover.)

  30. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 2:11 pm

    Paul Hemphill is quoted in this article. In his biography of Hank Williams, Sr., he talks about what a shock “Lovesick Blues” was when it first reached #1 in 1949, how the song it knocked out of the top spot was something by George Morgan, all awash in orchestration and not sounding particularly “country” even for that time. He made fun of the chorus: “Kisses wrapped in paper meant more to you than mine.”

    Yes, I did read the book.

  31. Chris N.
    December 9, 2010 at 2:23 pm

    Indeed, I would agree that there really wasn’t ever a time that country music wasn’t defined by a lot more than its purely musical content.

  32. Jon
    December 9, 2010 at 2:43 pm

    something by George Morgan, all awash in orchestration and not sounding particularly “country” even for that time.

    Either you’re not remembering what Hemphill wrote, or Hemphill was thinking of one of several later remakes of “Candy Kisses,” or he was just wrong. Tere’s a clip of the original, 1949 version here:

    http://bit.ly/eTrOYN

    And as you can hear, while it’s definitely smoother than Williams’ record, the “orchestration” is pretty much the same; a couple of guitars, bass and steel. And in its similarity to Emany hits of the same era by artists like Eddy Arnold and Jimmy Wakely, it was definitely part of the mainstream of “country” – or, to preserve the distinction that Chris made, “Country.” And of course, “Lovesick Blues” itself was essentially a pop song that was noticeably different from the hillbilly music of the string bands, Roy Acuff, Bill Monroe and other contemporaries. Both Morgan and Williams were part of a broad wave of modernizers who made a real revolution in country music in the late 40s and early 50s.

  33. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 2:55 pm

    I don’t have the book right in front of me, but as I recall, he made it out that the two songs were radically different. His description put me in mind of one of those cowboy songs from a ’40′s western movie that’s been all Hollywooded up with a string section.

  34. Matt Bjorke
    December 9, 2010 at 3:12 pm

    Country music continues to have the 2nd most radio stations in America, after news/talk stations.

  35. Barry Mazor
    December 9, 2010 at 3:13 pm

    Well, it’s certainly true that “Candy Kisses’ isn’t much like “Lovesick Blues,” just one hit song versus the other.

    Yet the establishment of Nashville as the modern country home base, and Hank’s special place in that as it was understood in his own day, had a lot to do precisely with Williams’ ability to write songs that could be picked up and covered by pop artists like Jo Stafford and Tony Bennett.

    As Jon was suggesting, “Lovesick Blues” had originally emerged from Broadway, and only slowly came to be associated with country. Hank’s “new” approach was almost retro, as he was basically splitting the difference between two reigning 40s Opry stars popular enough to star in movies–Southwestern Ernest Tubb and Southeastern Roy Acuff, and adding more charisma and aggressiveness,. People tend to forget how interested in broad pop success for his songs “Mr. Hard Country” Hank was.

    George Morgan was thought of as part of unabashedly Modern Country–in the same way Eddy Arnold was at that point, not Nashville Sound yet, so the instrumentation’s not much different..but still Modern post-War country. Jimmy Wakely, ex-cowboy, was in a similar smooth pop-influenced mode.

    So you never know how reputations will play out over time, but you could argue that Morgan had the modern records, Hank the honky tonk stringband throwbacks!

  36. Jon
    December 9, 2010 at 3:35 pm

    I don’t have the book right in front of me, but as I recall, he made it out that the two songs were radically different. His description put me in mind of one of those cowboy songs from a ’40′s western movie that’s been all Hollywooded up with a string section.

    Then either your recollection is wrong, or Hemphill was thinking of one of the later remakes, or he was just wrong. There’s a 30 second clip at the link I posted; you can hear that there’s no string section, and that’s all there is to it. Beyond that, what Barry said.

  37. Brady Vercher
    December 9, 2010 at 3:50 pm

    Here are the passages referencing “Candy Kisses” from Hemphill’s book:

    Hank’s recording sold forty-eight thousand copies in the first two weeks of its life in the stores, made the country charts after one month, and within three months–in the May 7, 1949, issue of Billboard–it had dislodged George Morgan’s saccharine pop song “Candy Kisses” at the top of the charts.

    [...]

    In the order of things in those days, the Grand Ole Opry couldn’t be far behind for Hank, but in the bigger picture there was this to consider: a sweet little ditty like “Candy Kisses,” more pop than country (“candy kisses, wrapped in paper, mean more to you than any of mine”), had been kicked aside by an anguished cri de coeur. A baton was about to be passed from one generation of country singers to quite another breed.

  38. Barry Mazor
    December 9, 2010 at 4:04 pm

    Right Morgan’s record was a hit–and then sow as Hank’s. And in all of four years later, the very year Hank died, , you could find the jazzy piano, the beginning of strings, the Nashville Sound pop flavored works, starting to pop up on record after record.

    But heck, he’d spawned such imitators as Ray Price, Porter Wagoner, George Jones and on and on–and in those cases, they wouldn’t sound that much like him for long. But mainly, they wouldn’t sound like Perry Como era pop either.

    The real point is, then as now, there were some more on the down home twang end, others more oriented toward out and uptown from down home pop. And these things go up and down in cycles. What else is new. (It wasn’t even a new bit of coexistence and compeition then.)

  39. Barry Mazor
    December 9, 2010 at 4:10 pm

    Oh, one other nice piece of history on hank Williams “versus” George Morgan–though it’s obscure. In ’51, Hank co-wrote a ballad called “A Stranger in the Night” with George’s brother, for George to record. Which he did.

  40. SW
    December 9, 2010 at 4:26 pm

    Great article. Thoughtful and articulate…

  41. Jon
    December 9, 2010 at 5:37 pm

    Thanks for looking that up, Brady. I think Mr. Hemphill was so wrapped up in what he took to be the neat symbolism there that he pretty badly over-simplified. The hard-core and soft-shell (to use Pete Peterson’s terms) duality of country music persisted quite nicely, as evidenced by the subsequent charts, which saw Williams taking taking turns at the top with Eddy Arnold, Hank Snow, Red Foley, Lefty Frizzell, Carl Smith, etc. – a pretty broad array. People like to tell the country music story as a series of set-pieces – this happened, then that happened, there was honky-tonk and then there was the Nashville SOund and then there was the Bakersfield sound and then… – but it’s actually a good deal more jumbled, with trends coinciding and overlapping as well as succeeding one another.

  42. Fizz
    December 9, 2010 at 6:54 pm

    No kidding! I guess I remembered him making a bigger deal of it than he really did (at least explicitly).

    As for “Kisses wrapped in paper meant more to you than any of mine,” well, George, the obvious solution would be to stop dating 12-year-olds, but I digress.

  43. Rick
    December 9, 2010 at 7:37 pm

    Barry Mazor said: “One very interesting finding was that, in fact, the percentage of women among today’s country fans (defined by sufficient amounts of listening to radio, going to shows, buying music, etc.) is really only slightly larger than that of the men–and barely at all more than the existing larger percentage of women in the population overall.”

    Barry, does that include all radio stations branded as “country and Country”, including the “Classic Country” stations that exist in many markets, or just the contemporary Country stations? I could see the probable majority of male listeners for the “Classic Country” stations skewing the overall demographic results a bit. I’m not surprised that a lot of guys listen to Top 40 Country radio as I would guess the really rockin’ songs from Jason Aldean and Justin Moore probably appeal mostly to men as harder rock styles usually do. I would also guess these guys switched to Country after growing weary of the stuff that passes for rock and pop these days (as mentioned in the article and comments).

  44. Susan K.
    December 9, 2010 at 7:38 pm

    I really liked this article. It’s funny, though, because I love traditional country music more than anything. But, ocassionally, I want my “pop/rock” itch scratched, as well. My husband gives me a hard time for liking Lady Antebellum, and other pop/country acts. It’s just different moods / different tastes, and I make no apology. I don’t think they claim to be “traditional country”. I’m not even sure I want anyone intruding on my “traditional” country tastes. I like discovering Ashley Monroes (my favorite) and Sunny Sweeneys on my own. Actually, I bought the first Lady Antebellum album without ever listening to it. I just buy alot of music, and don’t always end up liking what I buy. To me, it’s worth it. For every two or three albums I end up hating, I discover an Ashton Shepherd or Elizabeth Cook that I end up loving to bits.

  45. Stormy
    December 9, 2010 at 7:46 pm

    I could see the probable majority of male listeners for the “Classic Country” stations skewing the overall demographic results a bit. I’m not surprised that a lot of guys listen to Top 40 Country radio as I would guess the really rockin’ songs from Jason Aldean and Justin Moore probably appeal mostly to men as harder rock styles usually do. I would also guess these guys switched to Country after growing weary of the stuff that passes for rock and pop these days (as mentioned in the article and comments

    Why do you assume that classic country attracts more men than women?

  46. Barry Mazor
    December 9, 2010 at 10:28 pm

    Yep, Rick. TheE study included all chunks of the total country music audience, and, really, all of the ways they might get at the music. In fact, it even looked at people who were definitely not in the country audience too, to get at some of the reasons why.

  47. Lucas
    December 10, 2010 at 8:03 am

    Great article and Fizz you are right on. The pop music listeners of the ’80s and ’90s are now 30 and 40 years old, so the mainline country is aimed at them as they mellow out with age. The hot, trendy stuff is always aimed at the youth from 12-25 years of age, ala Garth in the ’90s, Carrie, Taylor, RF etc right now; in an effort to draw them from pop radio by bringing them “pop-lite” with more real lyrics.

    Thank goodness for Satellite Radio, the old XM 10 America was the best station ever, but it got gobble up by Sirius into Prime Country and the Roadhouse, but neither is as good as “America” used to be.

  48. Fizz
    December 10, 2010 at 9:01 am

    Barry, I’d be interested to see how that data you posted yesterday might compare with similar information (if there was any) from, say, 20-25 years ago, to see how the audience has changed over time. Or hasn’t changed, as the case may be.

    Lucas, you’re right, the whole Sirius/XM merger has been the death of a lot of the variety that the old XM channels used to offer. I remember several years ago, reading an article comparing the two services, saying X was based more on deep cuts and variety, and Sirius was more about “personality.” Well, we’ve got the personality now, but it seems like all the DJ’s do is read cards and jump right back into music, so where’s the personality?

Sponsors

Juli Thanki on WAMU's Bluegrass Country

Tagged In This Article

// // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // // //

Current Discussion

  • Jack Hanford: For those who are interested, there is a new 90-minute documentary video about Tompall & the Glaser Brothers on DVD …
  • joe morris: how come nobody mentions his fan club which started 1950 and was called the " the penny pushers " which …
  • jane: I'm reading this article in 2013 and I've yet to hear anything from the album played on the radio.....
  • Catwandy: I guess Matt C. is eating his well-deserved crow 'bout now. Critics....gotta love 'em , bless their little hearts.
  • Ed McClendon: Saw the brothers in Greeley CO on the occasion of Tompall's 50th birthday. The show wasn't well promoted and there …
  • Roby Fox: I'm sure no one else will know, or even care about this little tidbit of trivia. "Keep Your Change" was …
  • kate wonders: Roni Stoneman is still on Hee Haw every Sunday night on RFD channel.
  • Marsha Blades: Tommy, You were so kind to me during a tough time in my life and I don't think I ever …
  • Leona Jones: I seen Chris at the Grand Ole Opry last week.. First time I have heard of him.. He rocked the …
  • Sonicjar Music: Agree with Lucas, But one thing is certain, for a song to come to existence, so many things have to …

Recently Reviewed Albums

  • Blind Boys of Alabama - Take the High Road
  • Del McCoury Band & Preservation Hall Jazz Band - American Legacies
  • Aaron Lewis - Town Line
  • Josh Kelly - Georgia Clay
  • The Gibson Brothers - Help My Brother
  • jesse-brewster_wrecking-ball
  • Lucinda Williams - Blessed
  • Joe Mullins & The Radio Ramblers - Hymns from the Hills